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Shanghai
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Art at Site 	www.shanghaiart.org	Yong	Shu	Li Xiaolong, Bruce Lee
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Yong Shu

Li Xiaolong, Bruce Lee

2011
World Expo Park
Website
www.designcurial.com:
A 30 metre tall sculpture of Bruce Lee is being erected in Foshan, a city in Guangdong province, China, which is considered as the home of Chinese Kung fu. The red-painted ceramic statue depicts an eight-legged Bruce Lee, known as Li Xiaolong in Chinese. The sculpture will balance world-famous monuments on each foot including the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, Shanghai's Oriental Pearl Tower, and the Bird's Nest, or National Olympic Stadium, in Beijing. The towering sculpture resembles a stop-motion capture of Bruce Lee performing one of his explosive high kicks. According to artist Shu Yong, the sculpture is expected to take a year to complete. It will be taken to the Guggenheim Museum in Manhattan in 2011 as part of a grand world tour. It is hoped that the sculpture will become a landmark on the scale of the Statue of Liberty in New York Harbour. Artists further add that the Bruce Lee sculpture was designed to ‘help China communicate with the world on an artistic level.’ The sculpture also demonstrates how it is possible to use the least amount of resources during the act of construction. Foshan produces 25% of the world's construction ceramics, out of which 60% is used in China. Various smaller sculptures of China's most iconic martial arts fighter are also in the process of completion. These will form the centrepiece of China Kung Fu Pavilion, Foshan Week, which opened on 17 August 2010 at the Shanghai World Expo 2010. Identical to the 30 metre sculpture of Bruce Lee, these sculptures will balance different monuments on their feet. These ceramic sculptures were constructed by 100 people in six months. Situated in the ‘Pavilion of Future’ in the ‘Urban Best Practices Area’, the China Kung Fu Pavilion features kung fu elements and ceramic displays. It covers an area of 1,200 square metres and features 50 ceramic statues of Bruce Lee. The pavilion will be open to the public till 23 August 2010. The Guangdong city of Foshan is known to the world as the hometown of the late martial artists Bruce Lee and Ip Man, as well as for its ceramics industry.

www.chinadaily.com.cn:
hanghai - Artists in Foshan, a city in Guangdong province that bills itself as the home of Chinese kungfu, are creating a 30-meter-tall sculpture of Bruce Lee which they hope will one day become a landmark on the scale of the Statue of Liberty in New York Harbor. The red-painted ceramic statue depicts an eight-legged Bruce Lee, known as Li Xiaolong in Chinese, balancing world famous monuments on each foot. These include The Arc de Triomphe in Paris, Shanghai's Oriental Pearl Tower, and the Bird's Nest, or National Olympic Stadium, in Beijing. Over 100 smaller sculptures of China's most iconic martial arts fighter will form the centerpiece of Foshan Week, which opens to the public at the Expo on Tuesday afternoon. Identical, except for the monuments they balance on their feet, the sculptures took 100 people six months to complete, due to the complexity and size of the ceramics. The Enter the Dragon star was born in San Francisco of Hong Kong heritage but has ancestral links to Foshan. Recently, the series of Yip Man movies have celebrated his teacher Ye Wan, who was born to affluent parents in Foshan. In reality, the city competes with several Chinese towns and provinces for kungfu bragging rights, notably the Shaolin Monastery in Henan province. But Foshan locals claim more responsibility for promoting the art internationally over the last century. The towering sculpture, which looks like a stop-motion capture of Lee doing one of his explosive high kicks, will not be ready for another year, according to artist Shu Yong. "We hope it can compete with the Statue of Liberty. But our sculpture, The Kungfu God of 1,000 Legs, is meant to symbolize Chinese wisdom, creativity and health," he said. "We are taking it to the Guggenheim Museum (in Manhattan) next year as part of a grand world tour," he said. While the neoclassical Statue of Liberty was an international gift of friendship from France, Shu and cohorts hope an epic 10-year world tour will suffice.

www.independent.co.uk:
Such is the legend of martial artist Bruce Lee that his faithful followers now have plans for a 30-metre high statue of the man they claim will rival New York's famous Statue of Liberty monument. What's more, they want to take their creation on a 10-year global tour to help celebrate the life and times of Lee, who is credited with taking Chinese martial arts to the world through a film career that was cut short by his death at the age of just 32 in 1973. News of the plans has come to light during the Foshan Week currently being held at the World Expo in Shanghai (http://en.expo2010.cn). Foshan, in the southern Chinese province of Guangdong, promotes itself as the home of kung fu and has on display in Shanghai this week 100 smaller statue of Lee balancing some of the world's most recognizable structures - such as the Arc de Triomphe - on his outstretched feet. But the massive sculpture artist Shu Yong plans will not be completed for another year and will apparently feature Lee in full flight, using eight legs to make it appear as though the statue is kicking. "We hope it can compete with the Statue of Liberty. But our sculpture, The Kungfu God of 1,000 Legs, is meant to symbolize Chinese wisdom, creativity and health," he told mainland Chinese media. "We are taking it to the Guggenheim Museum [in New York] next year as part of a grand world tour." Lee was born in San Francisco and raised in Hong Kong but his ancestry can be traced to Foshan, hence the city has been keen to claim him as its own. Lee's name has once again been in the headlines this past month as the "on-again, off-again" saga of the fate of his former home in Hong Kong continues to drag on. The actor's former residence in Kowloon Tong - used during the time he sprung to international fame thanks to films such as Big Boss and Fist of Fury - was up until recently being used a short-stay love motel but its owner bent to public pressure and offered the place to the government if it was be used as a museum honoring Lee. But the Yu Panglin - known as "China's most generous billionaire" due to his generosity - and the Hong Kong government have now been bickering for more than two years on how the project might proceed. And Lee's only remaining child - Shannon Lee - fears time may be running out as the 88-year-old Yu's health deteriorates. "I do not know what will happen if a resolution cannot be found," Shannon Lee told the "South China Morning Post.". "It is possible that the project will have to be scrapped, which would be such a shame.